I hate the popularity that military shooters have

Most of the time there’s two sides of heated debates, and this is no different. In this editorial I’ll propound my case, which takes up an issue with the current military shooters, and I am sure that there’s many people out there who disagree with me, but there will be some who agree with me as well.

Let me get this VERY clear from the get-go. I do not blame video games for violence, that being verbal abuse or mass school shootings at all. This is downright down to bad parents, bad governments, lacking health care and mental instability. And this is not the cause of this article.

I don’t blame the developers for going this way. Looking at sales in this genre the past five or six years, it is pretty obvious that there’s a lot of money handed over to these companies by the consumers. While I respect other people’s opinions, I have a hard time understanding the situation fully; these games don’t really evolve that much, especially if we’re looking at the yearly release of Call of Duty – not to mention Medal of Honor that literally have flat on it’s face: going from top scores around the millennium to getting less-than-mediocre scores last year.

It’s not like I am scouring forums and starts to downtalk shooters, I am just not interested in them, as I don’t like the military and war- themed ones. I play Team Fortress 2 as it’s just cartoony enough to just be plain fun, and the addition of fun melee actions in Bulletstorm was making this game different enough for me to gain interest and in the end, having lots of fun playing through it. Below you see five reasons as to why I don’t get excited over the newest Call of Duty and why I am not surprised to see Medal of Honor getting bad reviews.

Here are my 5 reasons why they are boring:

They are all the same. Sure, there is small differences such as physics, names, lighting, graphics, settings and what decade the game represents. Comparing Crysis with Call of Duty aren’t really fair, neither is saying they are the same, but you’re still doing the following: Saving the day, getting guns, shoot bullets, more often than not shooting friends online and just being badass in general.

They are too simple. What originated my idea of five reasons was an article over at Venturebeat, and the gamers who play a huge quantity of shooters will enrage in the following, I’ll bet on it. VB is calling you guys casual gamers, and I happen to agree with them when reading their argument. The tutorial is more often than not played within a couple minutes – simply due to the fact that the games aren’t that complicated – run and shoot, maybe spiced up with a cover system.

They focus too much on the multiplayer aspect. I happen to like playing in my own pace, I HATE to sit and wait in a lobby before an online game, and I’d like to be able to pause my game at will without any consequences. This is something that won’t leave multiplayer games. These modern military shooters are often criticised for the short and linear single player experience in favour of expanding the multiplayer part.

The community. There’s assholes everywhere on earth, and even more online because there’s no real consequences (like a punch on the nose), and looking in forums, it looks like this “species” is gathering up in online shooters. Ranging from the spoiled 8 year old (who shouldn’t even have access to the game in the first place) who spout profanities at every single chance he gets, to the cheaters and modders that have an advantage over the other players. These people can really ruin the experience for the rest of the players.

There’s too many of them. The sales numbers are pretty clear, these games do sell, but a yearly release of two different series, and two more with a couple years between, and then all the random releases and introduction of new IP’s/franchises makes that sea pretty big. When there’s three different announcements of big games in the same genre at the same big convention, something is wrong. Especially when it gets tough to tell the games apart.

So where do you side? Tell us in the comments!

Written by

Getting sucked into games by Super Mario as a kid, gaming got on hold during her teens. Lured into gaming with the 7th generation by GTA IV, and a few years later intrigued by reviewing games, and now she's running gamingirl since 2009.
  • Ben Mullen

    An empathic YES to all 5 of those reasons. You have summed up my feelings exactly!

  • Joneses

    Agree with you. I’m not as articulate with the exact reasons why, but ‘military science’ games just… fail to engage. Maybe it’s the proliferation of these very same games over the years that have made them come across as bland and cookie cutter. It’s always the badass with the assault rifles who has special training that saves the day from the cliched plot. Major urghs.

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